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December 2015 Archives

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On record-keeping and alimony

Alimony is an incredibly important part of family law. It helps people who made certain sacrifices during marriage, or require a certain financial footing to live their life, to move on after a divorce. If alimony is awarded in your divorce, whether you are the paying spouse or the receiving spouse, there are some specific steps you will want to take in order to ensure you are properly keeping track of your alimony.

Don't make these 3 high-asset divorce mistakes

Unless you've been through the divorce process before, most people are caught off guard when they are served with divorce papers. Most people have no idea where to begin, let alone how the rest of the process will proceed. Many of these people will simply allow their emotions to take over, guiding them through the divorce process for better or for worse.

What should I do if my spouse isn't following a custody order?

If you're a non-custodial parent with a restrictive custody agreement, you probably cherish every moment you get to spend with your children. For you, these visits are a way for you to remain connected to your children and ever-present in their lives. If you lost these moments, you might lose the relationship you've worked so hard to maintain.

Impacts to your taxes after divorce

If you're currently going through divorce proceedings, many of your legal questions are likely being answered by your attorney. If you've obtained the services of an experienced family law attorney, then they've probably explained the rights afforded to you by law and how the process will proceed in the upcoming weeks or months.

In Maryland, do I need a hearing if my divorce is uncontested?

When it comes to the topic of divorce, it's not uncommon to hear people talk about the dissolution of a couple's marriage as being either contested or uncontested. In legal terms, contested means that the couple does not agree on at least one of the terms of the divorce, whether this ends up being a proposed custody arrangement or how assets should be divided.

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